Bienvenue á Paris

Ever since I was a little girl, I have always wanted to go to Paris. Many years later, my dream has come true. I am excited to say that I made it to the city of love.

A city known for its architecture, monuments, food, and wine, Paris is full of places to discover. Besides the Eiffel Tower and the Louvre Museum, the Parisian gastronomy is globally know for its pastries such as baguettes, croissants, and crepes, and being home to the prestigious culinary institute Le Cordon Bleu.

But Parisian food is just that, pastries. When it comes to a warm meal, it is not up to my standards.

The first day I was in Paris, my classmates, the professor, tour guide, and I went to Le Bullion, a classic French restaurant next to the iconic cabaret Moulin Rouge. I ordered a French classic, bone marrow. I was impressed by the dish, it was juicy and fatty, and when I put sea salt on top, it hit the right notes in my taste buds.

The entree was also a classic that I heard from Julia Child, whom brought French cuisine to the American public with a book called “Mastering the Art of French Cooking” (The Editors). Beef bourguignon, or beef stew, is a succulent stew with vegetables and soft meat that melts in your mouth. My beef bourguignon was the opposite of that. The stew had good flavor, but it felt like it was missing something, and the meat was tough.

As the days went by tasting bad food, the light appeared at the end of the tunnel. In a small restaurant near the hotel I was staying at, I found glory for my mouth, French onion soup.

This was without a doubt the best dish I ate while in Paris. The soup was rich in flavor with melted cheese and bread crumbs on top, and the complementary bread was absolutely amazing. The rest of the food was definitely not the best at this restaurant, but the onion soup was one of the highlights of the trip.

If you’re going to Paris to eat good food, don’t.

The city is for exploring monuments but not for food, except their pastries, at least that’s what I felt like while visiting the city of love.

Sources:

The editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica. “Julia Child”. https://www.britannica.com/biography/Julia-Child. Accessed 24 May 2019.

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